Haven
Haven Help System


HOW TO EDIT YOUR DOCUMENTS SUCCESSFULLY!!!

This help file is broken up into four parts:
I. When you'll need this
II. Ways to see your document
III. Ways to change your document
IV. Ways to save your document

PLEASE READ THESE IN ORDER!!! It will be most beneficial if you do.

I. When you'll need to edit

Here in Haven, the only times you as a player will need to edit anything
will be when you either post a note somewhere, or mail someone. In both cases, all editor commands should be useable. When you mail or post a note,
you are automatically in the editor, so It would be a good idea to know the
commands.
When inputing (we will assume in either mail or posting notes from
now on) your message, at the beginning of each line you see a * character
that gets typed over. This is the input prompt. It simply means it's ready
to add more input into your "file". To exit input mode, and get to the
place where you can edit or change what you just inputed, type a . on a line by itself and you will see a : character. This implies that you are at the command prompt of the editor program. You may now edit your "file", to
make whatever changes you need.
ALL COMMANDS FROM THIS POINT FORWARD ARE ASSUMED TO
BE FROM THE COMMAND PROMPT ":"

II. Ways to see your document

There are many ways to see your document. I'll discuss just a few, which
will be more than enought to get you where you need to go. First, it's
helpful to know that in order to edit lines of text, you must either get to
the line right before, right after, or right on that line of text. Each line
of text has in inbedded, hidden line number associated with it. So, in the
following message...
Hello Curly
Good to see you on. When's the next volleyball game?
How's the wife and kids? Tell Felicia thanks for the pot roast.
later
paradigm

... Hello Curly is associated with the number 1. paradigm is associated with line 5.
THE COMMANDS (remember, these are at the : prompt)
# <----- represents any number you type in
: # prints to your screen and associates you with the line number you type
in.
: #,# prints to your screen the range of lines between the two numbers.
: #p same as # except that it does not associate you with that line number.
: #,#p same as #,# except you remain associated with the line number you were
formerly editing
: = shows you what line number you are associated with
: p shows you the text of the line you're associated with
: $ shows you the last line of the "file"

for example
: 2
Good to see you on. When's the next volleyball game?

(You are now associated with line 2, meaning you can now edit the existing
line, add and input lines before this one, or add and input lines after this
one. )

: 2,4
Good to see you on. When's the next volleyball game?
How's the wife and kids? Tell Felicia thanks for the pot roast.
later

(Still associated with line 2)

: =
2
(showed you the line number you're associated with.)

: p
Good to see you on. When's the next volleyball game?
(printed the line you're associated with)


III. Ways to change your document

Once you've gotten to the command prompt and associated yourself with a
particular line, you can now edit the text of the current line, or you may
add and input lines before or after the current line. There are several ways to do that.

THE COMMANDS :

: i once you've hit return, you'll go into input mode. Type in everything
you need, and these lines will all go immediately before your current
line. REMEMBER> when inputing the lines, you're in input mode. To
get out of input mode, type a single . on a line by itself. The same
is true of all the these except the delete command you'll see soon.
: a appends text that you input immediately AFTER the current line. Works
just like the i command in that respect. Same rules apply.
: c changes the current line to whatever you input. If you have additional
lines, it will automatically insert them right after the line number,
just like the a command.
: d deletes the line you're currently associated with
: #d deletes the line number you specify, while remaining associated to your
current line number.
: #,#d same as #d except that it deletes a range of lines
: s substitutes, much like find and replace. complicated command, but cool
once you get the hang of it. I'll show several examples of it.
EXAMPLES
: 3 (associates us with line three)
How's the wife and kids? Tell Felicia thanks for the pot roast.

: i
Went to the meeting, but you weren't there. I was actually a bit worried,
since you had the reports. But the boss was fine, and we got the deal.
. <------- ends input mode
the file should now look like...

Hello Curly
Good to see you on. When's the next volleyball game?
Went to the meeting, but you weren't there. I was actually a bit worried,
since you had the reports. But the boss was fine, and we got the deal.
How's the wife and kids? Tell Felicia thanks for the pot roast.
later
paradigm

say we wanted to add "smile, today's your birthday" after the line about his wife and kids. That line is NOW line 5, so we need go to line 5
: 5
How's the wife and kids? Tell Felicia thanks for the pot roast.
: a
Smile! Today's your birthday!
. (end of inputing mode)

the file should now look like

Hello Curly
Good to see you on. When's the next volleyball game?
Went to the meeting, but you weren't there. I was actually a bit worried,
since you had the reports. But the boss was fine, and we got the deal.
How's the wife and kids? Tell Felicia thanks for the pot roast.
Smile! Today's your birthday!
later
paradigm

to delete the line about the birthday
: 6d

to delete the lines about the meeting and reports
:3,4d

Now, lets discuss the s command. it's simple. the format is
s.<what will be found>.<what will be replaced with>
for example to capitalize paradigm
: 5
paradigm
: s.p.P
: p (prints current active line)
Paradigm

Now let's change it to Lord Paradigm
: s.P.Lord P
: p
Lord Paradigm
to change something globally in the document
1,$s.<what will be found>.<what will be replaced with>.g

the current "file" should look like
Hello Curly
Good to see you on. When's the next volleyball game?
How's the wife and kids? Tell Felicia thanks for the pot roast.
later
Lord Paradigm


IV. Ways to exit your document

Well, for your needs, there's only really one way. Once you're finished
editing, simply type an x at the command prompt, and then follow the
directions about sending the message or posting the notes. The x command
simply saves the "file" and exits, whether saving the file as a mail doc or
a note doc.

Lord Paradigm
Adam "Paradigm" Dixon
9/9/97
dixona@coral.indstate.edu